The week in review – ending Sunday 15/05/2011

My second ever “week in review” before the show notes to an extra episode of TechBytes are released.  Whilst I wait for the files to be encoded, I decided what better time than to look over the last week.

Micro$kype

Skype being bought by Microsoft has been talked to death.  We’ve even covered it twice this weekend on TechBytes.  In a nutshell though, despite claims that on mention of Microsoft buying Skype, Linux users the world over will be busy uninstalling it, I take a more pragmatic look at the situation.

Lets get one thing straight, Microsoft is buying the success of another.  Skype is not a Microsoft innovation and any successes in the future will be thanks to the founding work of others.  Microsoft has cash and cash can buy you pretty much what you want.

Will I be dumping Skype? No.  For me Skype was (and still is) a convenient method of recording the TechBytes show, whilst many potential interviewees will be moving to SIP, there will be others who will stay.  The Microsoft acquisition has done nothing other than make SIP another alternative for me – as well as, not instead of Skype.  Since most of the potential interviewees are going to be using SIP then it seems highly likely that my usage of Skype will become less frequent.  The only caveat to that is there will be need for an OSS “share my desktop” for the TechBytes Videocast. – I will await any recommendations in lieu of my own investigations/experiments.

FacepalmBook

Moving on, we look at the Facebook incident and unfortunately anyone who has dared to write about FOSS being a valid choice in place of proprietary will see the whole saga as not surprising.  With that in mind it does nothing for my opinion of Facebook, in my view it was and is an insidious service which I have refused to have any part of.

PSN Back up!

The PSN is up again! At the time of writing this I saw that news hours late, which maybe is a testament to how important the PSN was in my  life.  Will I be clambering to get back on? No – I’ll take a look when I get some spare time.  I suppose its celebrations though for those who live by it. – Sony in my view had better eat some humble pie for the foreseeable future, they have many customers to win back.

It’s a F’Kin sell out!

I had a funny “debate” the other day with a regular Windows Advocate on Usenet.  It was based around the Kin (you surely remember that?) Anyhow, the upshot of the persons argument was an apparent resentment to me calling the Kin a “lifeless brick” which he could not understand shouldn’t be taken literally.  Of course we all remember how few units Microsoft sold before it was “killed” and this particular Windows advocate seemed to think that Kin wasn’t doing so bad after all because they were still selling the Kin devices today  (or flogging off surplus – depending on your viewpoint).

Taking the Windows advocate’s claim at face value though it would appear Microsoft’s WP7 has even more to worry about – Not only are people flocking to Android and Apple products, but now Windows Phone 7 has to compete with people who want to buy a Kin? – Oh dear.  Bad times ahead? or at the very least a Windows Advocate who needs to think through his advocacy first before he types it. You’ve got to love Microsoft Advocacy – You can find some fine examples of it in comp.os.linux.advocacy – Quite why they frequent a Linux group is anyone’s guess.

Goblin

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Mail: bytes4free@googlemail.com
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I can also be found in #techrights, #techbytes on freenode.net.

4 Comments Add yours

  1. Wayne Borean aka The Mad Hatter says:

    You’ve got to love Microsoft Advocacy – You can find some fine examples of it in comp.os.linux.advocacy – Quite why they frequent a Linux group is anyone’s guess.

    I’ve talked to a lot of people about Microsoft Advocacy on Usenet recently. Back in the good old days when we used Slip to get onto the internet, WWW wasn’t available, and Usenet was the killer application, there was some weird stuff going on.

    In the Borland News Groups you would see posts saying, “I like Borland Compilers as much as the next guy, but there are some things you can only do with Microsoft Compilers”.Later we saw the same sort of posts in the Netscape newsgroups, claiming that while Netscape was nice, there were things that you just had to have IE to do.

    Hidden Microsoft Advocacy is a dangerous thing. Pam Edstrom, the person responsible for Microsoft’s communications strategy, is the slimiest piece of work ever to grace a corporate board room.

    Wayne

  2. openbytes says:

    I would hope now we live in more enlightened times and the covert advocacy we see in the past is merely blatantly cheap posting from those who obviously are not interested in sensible debate. That being said, what this type of marketing has done is throw a veil of suspicion over anyone who makes a pro-Microsoft comment, which in the long run has done more harm than good.

    What might have seemed a good idea in the past, I think will prove to be its undoing. Can any reader honestly say that when they see a piece of pro-Microsoft literature, they don’t sit and think “hmm, sounds a little suspicious to me….” – Thats a shame, I think theres some honest people who will be labeled dishonest because of the actions of others.

  3. Contrarian says:

    In an environment where hundreds of millions of consumers buy Microsoft based computers and various other Microsoft hardware and software products each year, it seems suspicious to me for you to suggest that anyone who expresses a favorable view is being disengenuous.

    If some people can love Linux, whycan not others love Windows?

    1. openbytes says:

      “it seems suspicious to me for you to suggest that anyone who expresses a favorable view is being disengenuous. If some people can love Linux, whycan not others love Windows?”

      Firstly I’d agree, if people can love Linux they can love Windows. Infact in the above comment made days ago I say that and suggest that the vulgar tactics of some ruin it for those that are “legitimate”

      Let me re-quote myself:

      “Can any reader honestly say that when they see a piece of pro-Microsoft literature, they don’t sit and think “hmm, sounds a little suspicious to me….” – Thats a shame, I think theres some honest people who will be labeled dishonest because of the actions of others.”

      Honest people who will be labelled dishonest is what I said. Ive noticed that often when a pro-MS remark is made it is met with suspicion. As I say, thats a shame. Having said that the suspicious comments are now quite transparent, they are usually filled with buzzwords and read like a press release or they are just merely vulgar.

      As I have said before, honest held belief is advertising that no company can buy. I do what I do through an honest held belief that the software choices Ive made are the best for me. I do this for no payment, no gifts, but do it because I truly want to share my software choices with other people. I have no ties/connections with the IT world at all and any major shift in the marketplace would not effect my life in any way. I wonder, how many of the “advocates” Ive proved to have Microsoft connections can say the same?

      I hope when you say “suspicious” you are not implying anything about my viewpoint by that.

      Regards

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