Windows the trojan – Bitdefender is spot on?

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Heres what Bitdefender thinks of Windows. Maybe the most intelligent virus package in the world?

Its being reported that users of the virus software Bitdefender have had a surprise with their latest update.

Allegedly Bitdefender has identified several parts of Windows as a trojan, fixed them and subsequently brought down Windows.

Being flippant, one could argue that Bitdefender was merely doing its job and identifying Windows as a trojan was correct, another camp could list it as yet another issue Microsoft’s OS has stumbled into.

Now even years on from the first BSOD in Windows, crippling problems can still be a part of daily Windows life.  Maybe its these regular experiences that explain the apathy a Windows user might have to the problems they encounter whilst doing even the most simplest of tasks?

I very rarely say this, but this time the fault is not Microsoft’s although I think the cause of yet another Windows issue is of little concern to the end-user, rather the fact that Windows yet again is not working correctly.

Bitdefender had this to say:

Due to a recent update it is possible that BitDefender detects several Windows and BitDefender files as infected with Trojan.FakeAlert.5…

The problem seems to hit 7,Vista and XP users, there is a fix for this  and a comment from BitDefender.  But to me Bitdefender’s original diagnosis is spot on. ;)

Goblin – bytes4free@googlemail.com

18 thoughts on “Windows the trojan – Bitdefender is spot on?

    […] the operating system. That’s what one gets for trying to secure Windows. Our reader Tim wonders if “Bitdefender is spot on”: Allegedly Bitdefender has identified several parts of […]

    The Mad Hatter said:
    March 22, 2010 at 1:00 am

    ROFLMAO.

    Badtux said:
    March 22, 2010 at 1:14 am

    As a Linux penguin I’ve been saying that Windows is a virus for many years now, glad to see someone else now agrees ;).

    – Badtux the Linux Penguin

    Chips B Malroy said:
    March 22, 2010 at 5:26 pm

    Goblin says: “I very rarely say this, but this time the fault is not Microsoft’s although I think the cause of yet another Windows issue is of little concern to the end-user, rather the fact that Windows yet again is not working correctly.”
    ——————————————————–
    I am a little less generous than you on the blame part. In most linux distro’s, one runs as a limited user. The limited user, and programs that he run, usually (be not always) can only delete files in their home user folder. This is different in windows, as MS puts out a disk that by default makes the user the administrator. As which, the user in windows or most of the apps they run, can delete system files as well.

    How many home users have you seen that run as limited user in Windows? UAC does not count, as its not a true limited normal user account. I have seen multiple administrator accounts on windows home computers, but of all the computers I have worked on, I have never seen one setup as a normal user account, unless it was for business, usually on a lan.

    So yes, you are correct the fault was the user, who install an antivirus that deleted system files. Not MS who put out a bad security system which installs by default as administrator. Or maybe, MS needs to share some of the blame here?

    Chips B Malroy said:
    March 22, 2010 at 5:55 pm

    Follow up post. Antivirus programs in windows usually need administrator privileges to run and delete files that are infected. So you are correct that MS is not to blame directly.

    The sad part is I have had users (more than one) bring me there windows systems where they have cleaned their Windows of unneeded folders and files, in order to free space, and have deleted windows files in the process. Yes, it was their fault. But if the system was a bit idiot proof, setup as a normal user by default, this would not happen.

    Also, as bad as most of us know that windows is, if MS had tried to actually make the normal user account install by default a long time ago, and promote using it, there would have been less windows malware than what we see today. Not that it would have been as secure as Linux or BSD, but surely we can all agree that windows could be better protected than the default install that MS provided, and still provides from an installation. The anti-virus-malware programs have so much to scan for, and use various types of searching of files for comparison very rarely say this, but this time the fault is not Microsoft’s although I think the cause of yet another Windows issue is of little concern to the end-user, rather the fact that Windows yet again is not working correctly. to its malware databases, that it is not surprising that an antivirus deletes windows system files. In fact, this is not the first or the last time an antivirus will do this.

      The Mad Hatter said:
      March 24, 2010 at 9:51 am

      Follow up post. Antivirus programs in windows usually need administrator privileges to run and delete files that are infected. So you are correct that MS is not to blame directly.

      The change from having full privileges to limited privileges was actually the hardest part of switching from Windows to GNU/Linux and OSX, especially when my early attempts to dump Windows ran into problems, and there wasn’t anyone local to talk to about what was going on.

      Just think, it was only three years ago that I made the final move, and already I’m considered an old timer!

    Chips B Malroy said:
    March 22, 2010 at 5:58 pm

    sorry, copy and paste from the 3rd thinkpad mouse key got in the last post somehow and I did not catch it.

    Badtux said:
    March 22, 2010 at 6:50 pm

    On the other hand, if Windows was not so insecure and virus-prone this problem would have never happened either, because then you wouldn’t need antivirus software. So yeah, ultimately Microsoft bears a big heap of blame here…

    Andrew Macabe said:
    March 23, 2010 at 5:16 am

    To be really fair, let’s not compare apples to oranges.

    If a third party is to blame (again), it’s still the underLYING platform. How many third party proprietary programs written for GNU/Linux have hosed the OS?

    No matter how you stack it, Redmond’s platform is defective by design and not fit for purpose.

    Robotron 2084 said:
    April 3, 2010 at 5:05 pm

    “Now even years on from the first BSOD in Windows, crippling problems can still be a part of daily Windows life.”

    It’s misleading to say “daily life”, and to be fair it’s also something that can happen with Linux too. Crippling problems are a part of computer life.

      The Mad Hatter said:
      April 3, 2010 at 7:20 pm

      Robotron,

      It’s misleading to say “daily life”, and to be fair it’s also something that can happen with Linux too. Crippling problems are a part of computer life.

      Horse manure. It can’t happen to Linux, because Linux is designed differently. The only operating system that blows up like that is Windows.

      Just like the only car that blew up when rear ended was the Ford Pinto. Design issues are design issues.

      openbytes responded:
      April 3, 2010 at 8:50 pm

      Robotron please read what I say..I use the would “CAN” not “will” not “always” or anything else. Certainly from my own experience (and of my peers) the only crippling problems experienced were on the Windows platform. You may disagree, that is called debate, you provide your experiences and we talk….

        The Mad Hatter said:
        April 3, 2010 at 8:58 pm

        Problem free computing. Don’t use Microsoft software.

        Of course if everyone did this, Geek Squad would go out of business :)

        Robotron 2084 said:
        April 5, 2010 at 5:25 pm

        I read exactly what you typed. I know you used the word “can”, but that wasn’t what I have an issue with. You used the term “daily life”, insinuating that the issue occurs so frequently that it’s considered normal. Please make note of the quotation marks in my original posting.

        From my own experience, I’ve had Linux installs quit working entirely, usually after a kernel update or some major configuration change. This idea that Linux is so superior in design that it can never fail is simply ridiculous.

        It’s not hard to find someone who has experienced trouble with Windows. With a ~90% share of the desktop the odds are very good.

    openbytes responded:
    April 3, 2010 at 9:07 pm

    and if there was not alternative to Windows how could users like Robotron claim “..insert os here…. zealot”

    openbytes responded:
    April 5, 2010 at 5:35 pm

    @Robotron2084

    Quote “I read exactly what you typed. I know you used the word “can”, but that wasn’t what I have an issue with. You used the term “daily life””

    So you read it but still can’t understand it? I said can be a part of daily life. That was from personal experience of having to use Windows at home for many years. I didn’t insinuate anything and infact by not justifying that view in the first place (until now) it could be said that the comment was more balanced as readers would draw on their own experiences to decide if it had any worth.

    I try to make Openbytes readable and interesting for a diverse skill level range but Im sorry on the basis of your failure to understand basics I don’t think my site can cater for your level. Im sorry.

    Quote “From my own experience, I’ve had Linux installs quit working entirely”

    Then engage in adult debate and tell us. Don’t take post upon post of second guessing and dishonesty before getting to the point. This is what debate is (as you don’t seem to understand)

    Quote “This idea that Linux is so superior in design that it can never fail is simply ridiculous.”

    And where do I say that or even imply it? I can say from my own experience that Linux is far more stable, you claim it isn’t, fine….adult debate see?

    Quote “It’s not hard to find someone who has experienced trouble with Windows. With a ~90% share of the desktop the odds are very good.”

    Maybe you should consider (instead of a market share that MS advocates claim has never changed) the percentage of Windows users that encounter crippling problems and compare that to the percentage of Linux. We can’t compare like for like since the deployment numbers are different, but we can ask:

    Out of the total Windows users, what percentage have problems?

    Then do the same for Linux….and even Mac.

    The Mad Hatter said:
    April 6, 2010 at 1:42 am

    From my own experience, I’ve had Linux installs quit working entirely, usually after a kernel update or some major configuration change. This idea that Linux is so superior in design that it can never fail is simply ridiculous.

    It’s not hard to find someone who has experienced trouble with Windows. With a ~90% share of the desktop the odds are very good.

    Actually it’s easy to find people who have problems with Windows because Windows is badly designed. Linux breakdowns are damned rare because it’s better designed. Oh, Linux breakdowns do happen, but a lot of them are caused by lack of hardware documentation. Many hardware drivers for Linux are written by fiddling with the hardware, so its not surprising that some problems exist. Microsoft of course doesn’t have this problem, as the hardware manufacturers often write their own drivers for Windows. Of course their competence is open to question…

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