Discention in the MVP ranks?  Not on Scotty Barnes watch!  He's a "Rich Platorms Product Manager" you know!
Discention in the MVP ranks? Not on Scotty Barnes watch! He's a "Rich Platorms Product Manager" you know!

There may be a few of you who are asking what a Microsoft MVP is.  To quote the Microsoft site, which can be seen in its context by clicking here

“Microsoft Most Valuable Professionals (MVPs) are exceptional technical community leaders from around the world who are awarded for voluntarily sharing their high quality, real world expertise in offline and online technical communities. Microsoft MVPs are a highly select group of experts that represents the technical community’s best and brightest, and they share a deep commitment to community and a willingness to help others. Find some inspiring examples on the Microsoft MVP Award Program Blog.” (source: Microsoft Website @  http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/)

So that sounds great doesnt it?  Hands up who wants to be a Microsoft MVP?  What strikes me as strange is: “Microsoft MVPs are a highly select group of experts that represents the technical community’s best and brightest” is that just in Microsoft products or could a Linux user be an MVP? You see in my opinion its all well and good being the best and brightest, but if its just in one companies products then its a bit of hollow award (IMO)

Talking of being a Microsoft MVP, heres Dr Neil an MVP who had a few things to say about it all.  http://drneil.blogspot.com/2009/03/mvp-summit-thoughts.html hes made comments (which I quote below, again though I urge you to see them in context over on his site)

“This is the first time that when a Microsoft employee asked if I was here for the MVP summit I cringed as if I felt I didn’t want to be associated with the MVP group.”

“MVP status used to be something I was proud of, something that helped differentiate me as a person that adds value. Now I feel that being an MVP associates me with a bunch of Microsoft fan-boys (and some girls) who want to be the first ones to break the news that Microsoft is releasing product XYZ.”

“Yet I do not get the impression that MVPs overall are perceived to be adding great business value, and in some cases are presenting a hindrance to the progress of Microsoft products.”

And in my opinion (in reference to the last comment) some of them are posting on MicrosoftWatch!

But it gets better.  The commenters on his site agree with him in the main and have some constructive comments to make (IMO).

That is until Scott Barnes (allegedly the Rich Platforms Product Manager)  turns up.  What the hell is a rich platform?, is he refering to a Microsoft product?  maybe he’s taking about Linux, or maybe he’s declaring himself “rich” and hes just a Platforms Product Manager? 😉 – Joking aside, he has quite alot to say.

Now it may just be my interpretation of the series of posts, but in the face of all the other posters agreeing with Dr Neil, IMO Scotty boy comes across as a teacher scolding a naughty schoolboy and tries to turn it all into a positive.  If I was Dr Neil, I would be very insulted at the tone which (IMO) Scotty Barney takes.

But hey, thats just my opinion.   Maybe Ill nominate myself for a Microsoft MVP for next year?

*EDIT* I believe http://twitter.com/MossyBlog is the Twitter account of Scotty Barnes, stay tuned for the next exciting episode of “The MVP Strikes Back” who knows where defection will occur in the empire next? – Of course this is all said in jest, however I wonder why Scotty Barnes took it upon himself to “tell off” Dr Neil in public, when (IMO) it would have been far more professional to do it via email. Doesnt Scotty welcome free speach? If Dr Neil has something he wants to say on his own blog, shouldnt he be allowed to say it?