//
you're reading...
News

The economic drain of Microsoft – Where YOUR tax money is spent!

bmPeople still running a Windows system in the home will probably be able to appreciate the almost full time job of securing it against the latest malware, fixing nonsensical bugs which suddenly appear for no reasons and creating their own imaginative workarounds just to get the desktop functioning.  For the home user this may be seen as run-of-the-mill home computing, but put the same issues into government systems where your tax money goes and the problem becomes less of an annoyance and more a costly exercise – at your expense.

There’s an interesting article over on V3 which highlights that government computing bills on a per machine basis are around £6000 per year.  And keep in mind this apparently isn’t for state of the art systems, this is for Windows XP.

Aside from the huge waste in productivity outlined by Kelly, the government seems to be throwing huge amounts down the drain maintaining this outdated kit. The COO said he thought the cost of a single desktop PC was around £6,000 per year – for which he could go and buy 10 Apple iPads.

Source: V3

Now user’s of Windows can appreciate that boot up (and shut down) can take a long time.  Here’s your Government (in the UK)

“I came into the office and I pressed my PC and it took me seven minutes to boot up,” he told attendees. “That’s government in the old world, that’s three days of the year I waste of my time booting up.”

So as well as pouring money down the drain keeping these Windows systems functioning, we also find out that its taking time away from workers.

I could be sarcastic here and make reference to our government and it’s slow-time productivity, but that an wait for another day because it detracts from a series issue of tax payers money – Tax payers money in a time when vital public services are being cut to save money.

It’s little wonder that home users are looking for change, I wonder when the government and industry will do the same?

Tim.

Google+ : https://plus.google.com/u/0/114824920343832764896/about/p/pub

Twitter: www.twitter.com/_goblin

About these ads

About Tim Sparrow

Online tech writer, novelist/author of sci-fi literature and co-host of the TechBytes Show! I believe in multi-culturism & diversity. Luton Town FC supporter.

Discussion

7 thoughts on “The economic drain of Microsoft – Where YOUR tax money is spent!

  1. I think the problem of boot time is only partially Microsoft’s fault. XP is slow to boot, but it’s also an operating system that released in 2001. I don’t think any operating system from 11 years ago will seem snappy by today’s standards; it’s time to upgrade.

    The other problem is that the IT employees managing the machines are inefficiently using their GPOs, start-up scripts, etc. A Windows 8 machine with a handful of GPOs will get you to your desktop in 30 seconds or less. One that is launching 30+ GPOs, running start-up scripts after that, and doing who-knows-what-else it has been configured to do by an admin on the rampage will take forever by comparison.

    The following session would likely be handy for them:

    http://channel9.msdn.com/Events/TechEd/NorthAmerica/2013/WCA-B317

    It sounds to me like the government needs to have better educated administrators, and jumping to the conclusion that it’s all Microsoft’s fault is a little presumptuous.

    Posted by johnfail | June 6, 2013, 10:37 am
  2. “XP is slow to boot, but it’s also an operating system that released in 2001. ” – Very true but then remember many in industry stuck with XP and its running on hardware far higher spec’d than that which is was released for.

    The bells and whistles I’d suggest government not to need. Email, Office and a little browsing are all thats needed…. Oh wait, that can be done with a modern Linux distro, on the old hardware and far faster.

    “The other problem is that the IT employees managing the machines are inefficiently using their GPOs, start-up scripts, etc. A Windows 8 machine with a handful of GPOs will get you to your desktop in 30 seconds or less. ”

    Yep…It’s never Microsoft’s fault… It’s not the swiss cheese operating system which home users have suffered for years….Its the fault of the user, manager, IT pro…it’s all their fault.

    30 second boot up? I had that in 2008 when I installed DSL or #!CBL.

    “and jumping to the conclusion that it’s all Microsoft’s fault is a little presumptuous.”

    Well its Microsoft software running on government machines who have Microsoft contracts….who’s fault is it? We know the government is hapless when it comes to tech issues……that doesn’t stop it being Microsoft’s dodgy Windows being the issue. And whats the point of have backroom deals, contracts and licenses if the Software wastes days in boot up time? – and costs the taxpayer to boot.

    Posted by openbytes | June 6, 2013, 11:46 am
    • I don’t particularly agree with the idea that having higher specced hardware is going to fix an 11 year old NT kernel.

      “Yep…It’s never Microsoft’s fault…”

      That’s not even close to what I said or even implied. The idea of saying that it’s Microsoft’s fault when an administrator configures Windows improperly is like saying it’s Honda’s fault when someone ignorant swaps parts out of their car and it runs poorly.

      Posted by johnfail | June 7, 2013, 12:25 am
  3. “I don’t particularly agree with the idea that having higher specced hardware is going to fix an 11 year old NT kernel.”

    Really? A system which has had countless updates and continues to be one of the most popular versions of Windows….and you think 2006 spec’s should have a problem with XP? Really? After all this time?

    “That’s not even close to what I said or even implied.”

    Well who are you blaming?

    Oh yes….here we go:

    “The idea of saying that it’s Microsoft’s fault when an administrator configures Windows improperly is like saying it’s Honda’s fault when someone ignorant swaps parts out of their car and it runs poorly.”

    So you know its a fault of the administrator do you? As I sarcastically suggested (and would not seek to suggest you said it) – its never Microsoft’s fault….

    I also commented about the service contracts and licenses that Microsoft has with government – and its still the admins fault is it? So if all this lost time is the fault of the admin, why are the government not sacking the admin? How is it, in the world of blame especially with government, they are not infact seeking to blame admin?

    And where is Microsoft in all this? Surely if the admin (as you seem to know or believe) are at fault, why is Microsoft not stepping up to assist, afterall its a huge contract and I’d expect the government spend alot of money with them……

    Maybe because in using and working around a Windows system, issues like long boot times are common place?

    So what is it? Fault of the admin or fault of the 2006 tech? You certainly don’t seem to think its Microsoft’s fault, so who’s fault is it? Hal? Skynet? The purple people eaters?

    Answers on a post card.

    If it was presumption on believing it Microsofts fault, you seem to be the same in jumping to their defence.

    Ive highlighted why I think Microsoft is to blame with what was released (or not) to the press, all you’ve done is give an example of a Honda car in order to claim I’m being presumptuous.

    Posted by openbytes | June 7, 2013, 8:11 pm
    • Probably was. Microsoft’s fault that is.

      My son had borrowed my Dual Core AMD Linux box, when his gaming rig died. I got it back when he bought a new one, and Quad Core AMD. Both have good graphics cards, his is better of course.

      After we both installed our operating systems, including all drivers (which for me meant AMD Radeon Graphics drivers, everything else was on the disk), we had a boot-up race.

      I won, even though I was using KUbuntu with all the KDE plasmoids turned on. Slower computer, slower graphics card, more graphics intensive operating system, and it beat Windows 7, with a four core CPU and faster graphics card on boot up time.

      Linux has better optimizations is my guess. There wasn’t a huge difference. We were only talking seconds, but the older, slower, computer won using a more graphically intensive operating system.

      Neat.

      Wayne

      Posted by Wayne Borean aka The Mad Hatter | June 8, 2013, 3:27 am
  4. Hi Wayne!

    I remember that around 2008 (and I wrote about it here at the time) I was playing World of Warcraft – a Windows binary on Linux (Wine). I had the gfx settings way over what they should have been for the machine I was running it on and had great performance….pulling over 35fps on the higher gfx settings…..this certainly was better than the performance given by the exact same rig running Warcraft natively on Windows….

    Then again, its not Microsoft’s fault…..it was mine (or so the theory goes) Maybe Windows didn’t like the colour of my walls and thats why it was slower…..yep that will be it….not Microsoft code or their OS but mine for having the wrong colour walls…..

    Posted by openbytes | June 8, 2013, 10:39 pm

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Pingback: ~$10,000 Per Windows Desktop Per Year in the British Government, and Microsoft Wants to Deny Us Choice | Techrights - June 10, 2013

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

about.me

Tim Wilson

Tim Wilson

Writer/Novelist of many facets both in the world of technology and fantasy/sci-fi. Co-host of the TechBytes audiocast and writer for both OpenBytes and Goblin's Domain. Supporter of free and open source software.

Stats

  • 514,185 readers

Follow Tim on Twitter

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 7,234 other followers