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FOSS v Proprietary? – A debate between two geeks?

FOSS == Communism? FOSS == Fail? or could it the the collaboration of ideas and people (which Microsoft now seems to want a part of) be the destroyer of proprietary as we know it?

FOSS == Communism? FOSS == Fail? or could it be the collaboration of ideas and people (which Microsoft now seems to want a part of) be the destroyer of proprietary as we know it?

Today I am posting something a little different – Is FOSS communism?

I recently engaged in a conversation with Throttlemeister on Twitter where we have had a debate in regards to the benefits of Proprietary v Foss and everything in-between.

I will give you a little background first. Throttlemeister can be found on Twitter here, he currently runs two websites (links at the end of this article) and our debate started surrounding the general title of “Is FOSS communism?” I say its not Throttlemeister has other views.

NOTE: Twitter was completely unsuitable for a debate and so it was decided Throttlemeister would email his views, this article be written and a better forum for discussion.

Throttlemeister has concerns about how this article will be presented.  I hope that he agrees that there is nothing printed out of context and is happy with it’s presentation.  As always I am open to debate and am happy to edit anything Throttlemeister thinks in badly represented.

Heres the email and Throttlemeisters opinions:

Let me give you a little bit of history here. I started with Linux late 1994. Since then I have used Yggdrasil, Slackware, RedHat, Suse, Mandrake Ubuntu and Gentoo. I have run Linux on x86 hardware, DEC Alpha and SUN Sparc. I work, live and breath computers. Yes, I am a geek and loving every bit of it.

I don t agree with your statement of  your championing of Mac . While it is true that a Mac is my main computer these days, I am by no means a typical Mac user, or an Apple fan-boy. On my personal evil-o-meter, Apple business practices score higher than Microsoft does.  My reasoning for buying a Mac could probably not further away from a normal Mac user. My decision to buy a Mac was rather simple: I got tired of dual-booting Windows and Linux, due to lacking software under Linux that I need to use. I wanted to run UNIX while at the same time be able to run the software that I need.

Your argument of being able to use FOSS for every piece of propriety software I use is valid, but it is also completely irrelevant. The relevant point would if there is a FOSS replacement for me* . As it is, there are some, but there are more that FOSS does not have a replacement for, for me. I use my computer for work too, and if I get send MS Word documents or Excel spreadsheet that OOo chokes on, then OOo is useless for me. No matter how good a program it is, it is still useless for me and I cannot use it to replace MS Office propriety software.

I do photography as a hobby. To save myself work in post-processing, I set certain parameters and color settings that get stored inside the RAW file. But the only program able to read these settings is the Canon software. So I have to make a choice. Spend hours PP ing in FOSS, or use the Canon propriety software and switch to Lightroom for some final touches and exporting to SmugMug. Using propriety software saves me countless hours of work.

When I go out riding my motorcycle, I will create routes on my PC to upload to my GPS. Or update its maps. There is no FOSS at all for my GPS, on any OS.   And that s why I got a Mac, because all the propriety software that I need/want, runs both on Mac and Windows. But the Mac also gives me the UNIX base and I can go to the CLI, and do whatever I would use Linux for. To me, the Mac gives me the good stuff of Windows and Linux combined into one OS.

FOSS is great, if it fits your needs. If it doesn t, use something else. But don t go about saying that for every piece of propriety software, there is a FOSS alternative that is equal or better. It is just not true. It may be for some, but not for everybody.

As far as FOSS development, no I don t think it will last. It is communist principles applied in software development, and that s counter intuitive to human nature. What I mean by that is FOSS software development assumes everybody is equal and has equal rights and everybody does everything for the community under the assumption that the community gives back to everybody. Now that s communism. It is founded on idealism, as opposed to realism. In an ideal world, this would be the greatest thing since sliced bread. Unfortunately, we need to quickly realize every one of us is at heart a chauvinist capitalist pig. We want more than our neighbor. It works fine as long as everybody enjoys doing it as a hobby and donate their efforts to the greater good. But as soon as someone feels they should be able to make money from the work they are doing, or feeling better but under recognized than someone else, things are starting to go wrong. Countless FOSS projects have died because of human nature.

There is also a sense of non-committal. Things don t get finished, or are finished  when they are done . As a result, countless potentially great programs never get stable or actually useful for day to day usage, or updated too slow until alternatives catch up and pass. There are no deadlines that need to be made like there are with commercial software. Not saying that s perfect either, as companies release unfinished software that s not really ready because of a deadline (*cough*snow leopard*cough), but at least something gets done within a certain timeframe. I don t want to use a program that craps out all the time, because the developer(s) don t have time to look at it. At least with a company, you can usually be sure there will be fixes within a reasonable timeframe. <br> <br>That s not to say FOSS cannot deliver excellent quality work. Both FOSS and commercial software get new people and new ideas, but flat structure and lack of hierarchy creates an environment that invites people to open their mouth and put forth those ideas. This does create momentum for fixes and features. On the other hand, there is a lot of crap out there. Stuff that has so much abysmal code, it won t compile on a machine that is different from that of the developer. Having several Sun machines to play with will quickly teach you that. There are no such large repositories for Sun as there are for x86, nor are they as up to date. Compiling your own binaries is a necessity. But unless you are only using the big ones like Apache, php, mysql and the likes, be prepared to debug compile errors.

There are several examples of FOSS projects that are really successful. But I think it is worth noting most of these projects are run like commercial projects. And certain people make tons of money of it. Currently, this is mostly ignored by the community and covered under a blanket of idealism but the moment the community realizes and acknowledges there are people getting rich over their volunteer efforts, that project will die. It will likely fork, but that fork will either not gain enough momentum to sustain itself, or it will repeat the same cycle again.

Regardless what you believe and what will survive, we live in exciting times. We have different systems doing different things, giving us users CHOICE. Choice is good. But choice should be used good. You should chose what is best for you, what suits your needs. You should not put up with inferior software because it is FOSS and you oppose commercial propriety software or vice versa. That s stupid and limiting your own potential. Both have the right to exist and we should reward the ones doing a good job and punish those that don t, regardless of their development philosophy. That way, the good stuff survives and that benefits us all.

I m sure there is more that I should add, but haven t thought of this time.

Gijs

So thats his opinion and now I can follow on with mine.

Lets get one thing straight when I say theres a FOSS solution for proprietary I am talking about mainstream tasks and not some exotic custom app, although that in itself as a reason to use a Proprietary platform may well be irrelevant since Wine/Crossover offers some pretty astounding results and failing that there is always an option to run a VM.  I have often said that there will be a need for proprietary to deal with custom apps but you can also say that there is not a proprietary solution for many FOSS titles too.  Let me give some examples: Zsnes, Mame and Dolphin  for starters.  Theres no proprietary alternatives available for those.

In regards to my comment to him “championing the Mac” I use the word champion to describe something any user has settled on as a result of their own research and needs.  I champion Linux since I have chosen it above alternatives as its best for me.  Throttlemeister has done so with Mac on the same basis.

Throttlemeister makes reference to the needs of work and MS Office.  I think this highlights perfectly that far from Microsoft being “standards compat” and as some would like you to believe [1] entering into a brave new world of cooperation and interoperability with FOSS.  The fact remain that intentional or not, there are barriers for people wanting freedom of choice in their software solutions and its not a fault of FOSS.

To quote Throttlemeister “But don t go about saying that for every piece of propriety software, there is a FOSS alternative that is equal or better.” that in my opinion is an incorrect assessment of my view and something which I try to make clear using  “for me” or “in my opinion” .  If we talk about mainstream tasks such as Word-processing et al, then as I say unless you have some “exotic” requirements that are only catered for by a Microsoft product (and I’d love to know what those are) then most users will get EXACTLY the same functionality out of FOSS as they would out of proprietary, difference being the saving in cost.  As I said before many “exotic” apps that people require are not even made by Apple or Microsoft and when talking about Linux have full functionality in Linux through Wine/Crossover.

In Throttlemeisters response “using the big ones like Apache, php, mysql and the likes, be prepared to debug compile errors.” for me highlights this and whilst yes I do agree, this is hardly a requirement or issue to the “masses”  we can find examples all day in regards to issues we encounter, however I think the vast majority of them would not be applicable to the “average user”

So whats your take? Software freedom or Software communism?

So whats your take? Software freedom or Software communism?

MY CONCLUSIONS

To quote Throttlemaster “lack of hierarchy creates an environment that invites people to open their mouth and put forth those ideas.” is in my opinion completely wrong.  If anyone has ever been involved with an open source project will see that far from being a loose collection of people throwing ideas left right and center.  It is structured, it is organised and the direction is very clear.  Sure, the code released under the GPL may be taken away by another party and re-released as a different app and whilst there may be thousands of incomplete FOSS packages, as they say the cream always rises to the surface and imo most users won’t come into contact with them with the mainstream apps continuing to thrive.  The same is for any software too, there are freeware/shareware titles that have suffered the same neglect as that which Throttlemeister suggests is the remit of FOSS.  Funnily enough even proprietary has the same issues, look no further than Microsoft Flight Sim.  Unless I’m mistaken that title has now been dropped with no warning to its users (I remember a very upset user on Microsoft Watch stating he would boycott Microsoft products on the basis of that decision)

I have always said that the proprietary model is failing.  I believe that to be true.  In respect of most mainstream apps I think its true.  Its not reasonable to expect that people will wait around on sourceforge for the software they may require to perform more exotic tasks, but then thats where I think proprietary will remain, in the realm of custom apps for enterprise.  Another good example of where I believe proprietary has a place is within the gaming industry.  When you look at the titles that sell and look at the amounts of money spent in development of them, there is (IMO) no way a return can be made with a FOSS model.  FOSS gaming whilst very impressive does not come close to the production values of say a Star Trek game or GTA et al.  Gamers in the main, whilst will like Alien Arena (for example) won’t be boycotting COD or similar in favor of it.

Throttlemeister says “But I think it is worth noting most of these projects are run like commercial projects. And certain people make tons of money of it.”

And my answer to that would be…so what?  We are talking in respect of the end user and if for example, they have saved themselves a fortune by using Open Office instead of MS Office why would they care the background or how the free software came about? Throttlemeister said “Currently, this is mostly ignored by the community ” and its not, since there is no lock-in the code is released under the GPL (if wanted) and people can go away and make their own version of it.  Mark Shuttleworth has commented on the financial side of Linux before, Redhat published a very good set of figures this year and OpenSUSE/SUSE well, they rattle in the void between friends of Microsoft and the FOSS community (IMO)  I would say the FOSS community is well aware of the financial aspects of the various projects.

I’ll end on an agreement with Throttlemeister “You should not put up with inferior software because it is FOSS and you oppose commercial propriety software or vice versa.” and anyone reading this blog who knows my stance would say that this has been my opinion from day one.

I think many people think of FOSS as a type of software in itself.  Its not simply a different way of working/producing software than proprietary (IMO).   Just look at the examples around us today and ask “Why should I pay for Microsoft Office when Open Office is around” (maybe some can answer that) or look at the popularity of Chromium and Firefox and ask “Why should I simply go with IE because its bundled with Windows?”

Its been an interesting discussion.  Whats your view?  FOSS or proprietary? or are you like many of us, somewhere in between?

Throttlemeisters sites are: http://www.sport-touring.eu and http://www.crashdot.com

Goblin – bytes4free@googlemail.com

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About Tim Sparrow

Online tech writer, novelist/author of sci-fi literature and co-host of the TechBytes Show! I believe in multi-culturalism & diversity. Luton Town FC supporter.

Discussion

15 thoughts on “FOSS v Proprietary? – A debate between two geeks?

  1. Goblin: “Lack of hierachy” = flat structure, as opposed to the typical pyramid of bosses and manager in a company. A flat structure allows people to open up, which is what I meant.

    You also pulled the “equal or better” statement slightly out of context. Please go back to the 3rd paragraph (before the examples) to see where it comes from.

    I don’t consider a word processor, spreadsheet or RAW converter exotic software. You really don’t want to know what some manager are capable of creating using Word or Excel that gets completely borked by alternatives.

    Using Wine/Crossover is just nonsense when you talk about mainstream tasks. These apps are notoriously hard to setup for ordinary mom and pop users and do not work with all software. They are also not exactly high performance most of the time.

    As far as your “so what” comment regarding end-users, they will care when the developers walk away and their program becomes obsolete. It is a definite risk to FOSS.

    In all, you comments are a lot more balanced than they were in our twitter discussion. We’re mostly on the same page. ;)

    Posted by throttlemeister | September 19, 2009, 11:02 pm
  2. Quote “You also pulled the “equal or better” statement slightly out of context. Please go back to the 3rd paragraph (before the examples) to see where it comes from”

    If you are refering to the picture, that was not suggesting you said that (otherwise I would have said so) It was merely food for thought and if you notice the end of the article has:

    “Whats your view? FOSS or proprietary? or are you like many of us, somewhere in between?”

    I printed your reply (without interuption) specifically so that readers could see exactly what your opinion was. I believe you did compare FOSS to communism in Twitter, however I did not quote that as I considered your email the definitive answer to your opinions. I hope that is cleared up. If you were refering to my comment of:

    “our debate started surrounding the general title of “Is FOSS communism?” I say its not Throttlemeister has other views.”

    Again, I am not saying what your views are (merely printing what you sent. You do have other views to me and our conversation on Twitter became interesting when a comparison was drawn to communism/foss. Where you stand on that issue, readers can judge for themselves as I hope you will agree I have not missed anything out of your text and readers are free to see the Twitter conversation.

    Quote ” don’t consider a word processor, spreadsheet or RAW converter exotic software.”

    Completely agree and thats what I was saying, a mainstream task such as Word-processing is, IMO as equally well catered for in OO as it is in MSoffice. Exotic would be something like a Snes emulator or a dev environment, we are (hopefully) talking about average users and the point I make is that whatever is brought up in relation to Linux not being able to do something is strictly the remit of a limited few and not of the masses.

    Quote “Using Wine/Crossover is just nonsense when you talk about mainstream tasks. ”

    Why? If for whatever reason someone really does want to run X Windows binary and they want to do that within an arguable more stable and secure environment of Linux, whats the issue? We both agree choice is good, platform aside people should be free to choose what they run.

    Quote “. They are also not exactly high performance most of the time.”

    Sorry I will have to dispute that robustly. I have documented a few binaries here that do run far better on Wine than natively on Windows….World of Warcraft was one and from users reports many many other apps run faster through Linux/Wine than they do natively in Windows. Another good example….UAE, higher frame rates in Linux/Wine than through XP (it was documented here)

    Quote “These apps are notoriously hard to setup”

    What harder than installing it like any other software and then it running seamlessly on your desktop. When a Win binary is encountered it runs it. Theres no messing around with it that I have encountered. Maybe your Wine experiences are out of date. Today’s Wine certainly is not an intrusive beast at all.

    Quote “As far as your “so what” comment regarding end-users, they will care when the developers walk away and their program becomes obsolete.”

    Thats been proven to happen, where? Firefox? OpenOffice? AbiWord? Chromium? The same could be said of proprietary too (Flight sim example above) and what about a software house folding? Nothing is for ever (IMO) just like how the home user running WB1.3 in the 90’s could not imagine using anything else, they did when Amiga users went the PC route. I would also say there is less of a risk to FOSS packages because unlike proprietary if the devs “walk away” the FOSS package source is available and someone else if they wish can take it on….that wouldnt happen with a proprietary closed source app would it?

    Quote “In all, you comments are a lot more balanced than they were in our twitter discussion”

    They are exactly the same. The Twitter 140 char is limiting, however I stand by everything I say on Twitter. I think its merely a case of Twitter not having the scope to be able to explain opinion fully.

    Posted by openbytes | September 19, 2009, 11:36 pm
    • On twitter, you said: (quote) “what can you do with your proprietary software that I cannot with FOSS….”

      My line “But don t go about saying that for every piece of propriety software, there is a FOSS alternative that is equal or better.” is directly related to that, and my 3rd paragraph where I explain my reasoning of why it isn’t so.

      As far as my opinion that FOSS will fall apart, I didn’t say it has happened, I am saying I predict it will due to human nature (see the communism analogy).

      Posted by throttlemeister | September 20, 2009, 7:05 am
      • Yes and I repeat we were talking mainstream apps not custom or exotic ones that perform a unique task that maybe has a very small and niche audience. I meant that comment in respect of Wordprocessors for example and to make it clearer for you the example I had in mind was a question aimed at the differences between MS office and Open Office. OO is FOSS… The question about what can you do, was not a representation that FOSS in itself was an answer to everything but an opportunity to see what exactly it was that you could do when paying for software over using FOSS.

        You gave the answer to that and I commented (numerous times) that the tasks you put forward as “proprietary only” were hardly something the mainstream were looking at.

        I am sorry if you thought this was a debate about why YOU should use FOSS. I did make it clear on numerous occassions that we are talking computing in general.

        The idea of the question that I put to you was your opportunity to give a feature that the mainstream user would need that could only be achieved with proprietary software. You couldn’t (as I knew you wouldnt be able to) and it highlighted for the mainstream user there is no need to dip into their pocket and pay for solutions that already exist for free. I hope that is clear now.

        Quote “I didn’t say it has happened, I am saying I predict it will due to human nature (see the communism analogy).”

        Are you reading what I am typing? Where did I claim that you said FOSS had fallen appart?…Again I repeat look to the end of the article where I say “or are you like many of us somewhere in between?”

        Posted by openbytes | September 20, 2009, 8:02 am
  3. *Additional
    Quote “Lack of hierachy” = flat structure”

    Again as I said, Opensource projects are taken very seriously (or certainly the mainstream sucessful ones are) just as in a proprietary dev house its a team of coders working to a goal, there is a structure and its not an open ideas free for all. Its far more organized than that.

    The only real difference comes when the RC meets the end-user that being the whole package is open. Certainly when I’ve assisted in projects in the past it has not been a case of siting around the camp fire throwing ideas into a pot and hoping it comes out ok..

    Posted by openbytes | September 19, 2009, 11:40 pm
    • You’re still not getting what I mean. Lack of hierarchy != lack of structure. I am talking about organizational structures, not competence or effort. Most companies have a pyramid hierarchy. You can only talk to the manager directly above you. This limits communications and present fear for repercussions if you go ‘over their heads’. FOSS typically does not have such a strong stepped hierarchy and as such has more open communications.

      Posted by throttlemeister | September 20, 2009, 6:56 am
      • Eh?

        First of all you claim

        “Lack of hierachy” = flat structure

        (please check your own comments)

        and then you now say:

        “Lack of hierarchy != lack of structure”

        For those that don’t know the “!=” designation is used in coding for “not equal to..” Please confirm what you are trying to say, its not very fair to expect me to comment on your responses if you are not typing them correctly in the first place…

        Quote “You can only talk to the manager directly above you. ”

        This can go around in circles and Ive already given my point about a professional FOSS project. It behaves (as far as the coder is concerned) in exactly the same way as a proprietary one….The business structure (or lack of it) behind the FOSS project is irrelevant. Coders code, pen pushers push pens and if the project is properly run then it goes to spec regardless of whats happening around it.

        Even if what you say is true, the mainstream examples of FOSS alternatives FF,OO et al, all have firm company backing do they not?

        If what you say had any reality then we would not have seen FF,OO et al. As I said before the time a FOSS project differs from a proprietary one is at RC stage when its left open to the users…

        Quote “FOSS typically does not have such a strong stepped hierarchy and as such has more open communications.”

        Think about what you’ve said. Doesn’t that just prove then how good a system is? Think about this, Microsoft made millions with a massive firm of employees and STILL came up with Vista….Linux for example is using what you suggest at best is a business model with issues and managed to produce a more stable secure system…

        From what I see in your argument you are (i believe) trying to argue the flaws in the FOSS development process. Unfortunately there’s no examples of it failing as you have described and all we have are sucesses. These are such as Firefox sucking the life out of IE, OpenOffice taking a chunk of MS Office and finally Linux (and other alternatives) taking away customers from Windows.

        The worries and predictions that you claim have not bearing since FOSS/Linux is more popular today than it ever was…As I gave an example with MS Flight Sim, if any model has the potential to leave users high and dry its proprietary….unless MS decides to release its flight sim code under the GPL? I wouldn’t think so and the proprietary ethos is “if we are not going to market it, no-one else will”

        And you are saying FOSS has flaws? Try using that argument to convince someone to stay with IE…

        Posted by openbytes | September 20, 2009, 8:17 am
  4. foss has proved its worth over proprietary time and time again. if there is a rare occasion that i need to run windows software then wine is great.

    Posted by Romeobit | September 20, 2009, 9:08 am
  5. Without diving too deep into this one for now, I’ll say that I think Vista may have done damage to the reputation of the proprietary model that may not soon go away. I’m not saying that the Vista is proof that the proprietary model has collapsed. But I am saying that the myth of the proprietary model as the one true way of creating software might have been forever shattered.

    The largest, richest, and most powerful software company in the world spent several years developing the closed source Vista, and look what turned out. Now compare that to what has been achieved in the last 4 years by the open source model with Linux. Speaking of the OS itself, I’d be interested to hear anyone that could successfully defend the idea that Vista is even close to Linux in terms of quality, much less superior. Also, see IE vs Firefox.

    Even if a version of Windows is eventually released that can be considered a quality OS again, Vista will likely always be remembered as an epic failure of the proprietary model.

    Posted by Will | September 21, 2009, 2:37 pm
  6. Hi!

    Now that would be something! Its funny that before the Windows 7 PR started, you would have probably found many people to step up to the mark. Remember when we had our MS Faithful saying things like “Vista is loved” etc etc…Oh how times change.

    Quote “, Vista will likely always be remembered as an epic failure of the proprietary model.”

    Agreed, but more than that I believe history will record it as being the start of a change in computing…long live not just Linux, but alternatives to Microsoft as a whole!

    Posted by openbytes | September 21, 2009, 8:20 pm
  7. Since the “Communism” analogy came up in this discussion, here’s an interesting read to go along with it:

    http://www.roughlydrafted.com/2007/12/13/soviet-microsoft-how-resistance-to-free-markets-and-open-ideas-will-the-unravel-the-software-superpower/

    Posted by Will | September 22, 2009, 1:52 pm
  8. What an utter waste of time.

    Most of this was spent on his personal use (zzzzz) and that some FLOSS projects are better than others.

    THe part about it being communism is short and bland and not even worth putting on paper (!).
    If this was an assignment it would be a C-.

    Sharing with other is NOT communism.
    Marx didnt have the monopoly on collaboration.

    As the son of research scientists who have collaborated their whole academic lives, the idea of GPL like sharing is not new nor did it have anything to do with their politics.

    But some people have no concept of collaboration or even sharing with others (I blame lack of breast feeding!) so anything that isnt “Mine, mine, mine.”
    is communism.

    As a defender of this idea, he does a piss poor job and once again…. annoyed that I wasted time on such pedantic tripe.

    Posted by Dave's Not Home | September 27, 2009, 5:05 pm
  9. As someone in between, I agree with Throttlemeister that even for fairly mainstream apps, FOSS doesn’t always have a sufficient alternative. OpenOffice is a great example. I used it for more than a month this spring in university in lieu of Microsoft Office. It simply isn’t compatible enough, even with Office 2003 formats. I ended up downloading Powerpoint Viewer as Impress simply wasn’t cutting it for viewing .ppt files, and wasn’t able to match the productivity I achieved in Office 2007, even giving time for adjustment. At the end of my experiment, I was glad to be going back to Microsoft Office.

    That said, there is some free software that I find quite useful. GIMP, though not always as intuitive as I’d like, is nevertheless a good program at a great price, and I’d likely be using Banshee or Amarok if they had Windows releases. All else equal, I see no reason not to use FOSS software.

    But I’m glad to see openbytes write, “You should not put up with inferior software because it is FOSS and you oppose commercial propriety software or vice versa.” One of the things that most turns me off about the FOSS community is the insistence of many of its members to use FOSS at all costs – a “with us or against us” philosophy (as seen in some of the Miguel de Icaza debates). As someone who has no intention of being unfree-software free in the foreseeable future, such an attitude is a big turnoff to becoming actively involved in the FOSS community. Why work with them when half the people (seemingly) will be ready to burn me at the stake because I like some proprietary software? That’s not the sort of community I want.

    The question of whether to include Windows binaries for FOSS is one I find particularly interesting. I understand that there needs to be some incentive to make the jump to GNU/Linux/The Herd (someday). But if Windows users don’t see much of what FOSS can offer them, where’s the incentive? The other issue is that most Windows users are satisfied with what Windows offers already, so they’re willing to stick with that.

    To be sure, I’d like to be able to modify a few parts of Windows to better suit my needs/make it a bit more efficient in places. But it’s still the best fit for me on the whole (well, at least, XP is – I was about to give Ubuntu serious consideration before “down”grading from Vista), and just because I can modify software wouldn’t mean I’d want to actually do so in practice. I’ve got better things to do with my time, and existing projects to code on if I want to code.

    Economically, I’d rather depend on selling software than support for FOSS software, but I’m no economics major, either. But I can’t see Microsoft making anywhere near as much from Office were it FOSS as they do now with it proprietary, and as someone who hopes to make a living in this field someday, that makes the proprietary model seem a bit more attractive for making a living.

    Posted by Andrew | November 5, 2009, 5:41 am
  10. Amazing Article, I am signing up to your RSS Feed so I can stay up to date with your posts.Although people have new consoles such as the Xbox 360, a surprising amount of people still get their SNES Console out of the loft to play on it. I honestly think that you can never beat playing a game such as the original Zelda for days on end!With the expensive prices of the Nintendo Wii you can always pick up a Cheap SNES Console!

    Posted by Kim Lints | February 6, 2010, 12:43 pm

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about.me

Tim Wilson

Tim Wilson

Writer/Novelist of many facets both in the world of technology and fantasy/sci-fi. Co-host of the TechBytes audiocast and writer for both OpenBytes and Goblin's Domain. Supporter of free and open source software.

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